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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

performance

With five, nine-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a consumer believes that every unit of a particular branded product performs the same way as the other units of the product and with the same goal.

With four, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes his/her initial experience with a product to have been a one-time event and not representative of the product in general.

The extent to which a consumer believes that the quality and performance of options within a product category differs a lot is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  A two-item version is discussed as well.

With three, 100-point items, the scale measures how much a person is troubled by algorithms that can perform a particular task better than humans.  The actual task is not stated in the sentences and, whatever it is should be made clear to participants prior to filling out the scale.

Three, 100-point items measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular task is not just accomplished well by algorithms, but performs better than humans.  The actual task is not stated in the sentences and, whatever it is should be made clear to participants prior to filling out the scale.

This eight-item scale measures one’s need to perform better than others and the desire to win in interpersonal situations.

Three, seven-point items measure the degree to which a person believes he/she is performing well so far in a class and meeting his/her grade expectations.

How well a person believes he/she performed on a particular test and met his/her expectations is measured with five, seven-point items.

A person’s belief that a particular service will be good is measured in this scale with four, seven-point items.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person is unsure about how a company’s stock will perform.