You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

personal

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree of control one has over the personal information possessed by a company is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

The scale uses four statements to measure a consumer's belief that Internet shopping websites should treat shoppers as individuals, allowing them to personalize their experiences.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.

A person's belief that personalized advertising has benefits such as being treated as an individual and receiving relevant information is measured in this scale with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

A three-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a teenager describes the media as having a major influence on what he/she buys.

The scale is composed of Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a person expresses an awareness of self as a social object with an effect on others.