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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

personal

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s preference for normality and routine in his/her life rather than change.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a product conveys the presence of a human being, with an emphasis on social and affective attributes.

Nine, four-point items are used to measure how much a person engages in self-examination and introspection.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree of control one has over the personal information possessed by a company is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

The scale uses four statements to measure a consumer's belief that Internet shopping websites should treat shoppers as individuals, allowing them to personalize their experiences.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.