You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

personal

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person’s preference for normality and routine in his/her life rather than change.

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a product conveys the presence of a human being, with an emphasis on social and affective attributes.

Nine, four-point items are used to measure how much a person engages in self-examination and introspection.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person believes it is okay to give misleading or incomplete personal information to a company and that he/she is likely to do it.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a customer’s attitude regarding his/her susceptibility to being harmed because of the personal information collected by a company.

The extent to which a person believes there are benefits to a particular company having and using his/her personal data is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree of control one has over the personal information possessed by a company is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses four statements to measure whether a person believes that an ad was deliberately personalized for his/her situation.  To be clear, the scale does not measure if someone liked/disliked the personalization but rather if some degree of personalization was noted in the ad.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

The scale uses four statements to measure a consumer's belief that Internet shopping websites should treat shoppers as individuals, allowing them to personalize their experiences.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to shopping sites in general.