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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

personality

A person's tendency to learn about and adopt innovations (new products) within a specific domain of interest is measured with six, five-point Likert-type items.  The scale is intended to be distinct from a generalized personality trait at one extreme and a highly specific, single product purchase at the other extreme.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures whether a person has a habitual mental attitude in which self-distinctiveness is emphasized or, at the other extreme, an integration mindset in which assimilation and cooperation are emphasized.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure one’s self-efficacy with regard to accomplishing goals in life despite obstacles.

Four, seven-point uni-polar items are used to measure how much a person is described as being kind and friendly.  (Two versions of the scale are described, both having four items and three of them being in common.)

A person’s chronic motivation to critically evaluate alternatives in order to improve the quality of decisions that are made is measured with twelve, six-point Likert-type items.

The scale has twelve, six-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s chronic motivation to make progress towards achieving a goal in a direct manner without deviation and distraction.

A person’s preference for multitasking (switching attention among several ongoing tasks) rather than performing one task at a time until its completion is measured in the scale with 14 Likert-type items.

The scale uses ten items to measure a person’s tendency to be engaged in what he/she is doing with undivided attention rather than being distracted such as with multi-tasking and mind-wandering.

The tendency for a person to notice and attend to thoughts and feelings having to do with physical aspects of his/her body is measured with six, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s tendency to notice and attend to sounds, smells, and visual aspects of his/her nearby surroundings.