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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

personality

The tendency for a person to notice and attend to thoughts and feelings having to do with physical aspects of his/her body is measured with six, seven-point items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s tendency to notice and attend to sounds, smells, and visual aspects of his/her nearby surroundings.

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure a person’s tendency to notice and attend to his/her emotions and changing moods.

A person’s tendency to express and verbalize his/her thoughts and feelings is measured with eight items.

The tendency for a person to notice or attend to a variety of stimuli, both internal (such as thoughts and feelings) as well as external (such as sights, sounds, and smells) is measured with 12 items.

Seven, seven-point items are used in this scale to measure a person’s enduring belief that he/she is superior to others and makes him/herself the center of attention.

The scale uses four, five-point items to measure a person’s tendency to put off making decisions and acting upon them.

This nine item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a consumer’s chronic tendency to save money that is incorporated into his/her lifestyle.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s enjoyment of trying unfamiliar experiences. Although three of the statements are general and do not indicate what is being experienced, two items mention products.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a trait-like attachment style characterized by the fear of rejection and abandonment.