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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

personality

This is a 30-item, Likert-like scale purported to measure a person's expressed tendency to speak up for his/her "rights" in social situations, some involving marketers, others not. Rathus (1973) used a six-point response scale in his work. Richins (1983) did not specify the number of points on the response scale she used nor whether the full scale or the abbreviated version was used.

A forty-item, six-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree of openness (or lack thereof) in a person's belief systems. A 20-item version of the scale was used by Shimp and Sharma (1987).

This is a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring a person's reported desire to be among the first to buy new things.

A 34-item scale is used to measure a person's expressed tendency to experience three dimensions of psychological hostility: assault, irritability, and verbal hostility.

This 12-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reads ads, shops around, and gathers information apparently out of curiosity.

This is a three-item, five-point scale that measures a person's desire to be among the first to own clothing of the latest style.

Two statements with a seven-point Likert-type response format are used to measure a person's general level of certainty and self-assurance.

This is a two-item, six-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree of concern one expresses about his or her financial condition.

This seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person reports being loyal to what he or she has been using rather than trying something new and/or different. To be clear, it is the tendency be loyal within product categories that is being measured. Raju (1980) referred to the scale as repetitive behavior proneness.

A five-item, Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person asserts his/her opinion in an unyielding manner.