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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

personality

Fourteen, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person’s trait-like tendency to be concerned about the needs of others as well as expecting help from them when needed.

The extent to which a person believes in one’s ability to change the self is measured with four, six-point Likert-type items.

Seven, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings that are expressed in terms of optimism about the future.

With six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s general and enduring tendency to experience feelings of closeness and trust with other people.

A person’s desire to be distinct from others and to do things that make one’s self different is measured with three, nine-point items.

The belief that one can change his/her personal traits is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she has the motivation and the ability to control and achieve desired outcomes.  The scale is general in the sense that it can be used in a wide variety of contexts.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure one’s tendency to make decisions and to buy impulsively with regard to a specific good or service.

A consumer’s general tendency to make purchases without planning and control is measured with six items.

The belief in one’s ability to influence another person or group is measured with eight statements. To be clear, the scale does not explicitly measure one’s use of power but rather the confidence that one has it and can use it.