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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

personality

A person’s feeling of uniqueness and status (though not necessarily superiority) is measured in the scale with three, nine-point items.

The extent to which a person focuses on his/her personal thoughts and feelings is measured with three statements.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state than a trait measure.

The scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a person is very sensitive of his/her contextual environment.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state vs. trait measure.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used in this scale to measure how much a person describes someone or something as being skilled and reliable.

A person's description of his/her level of innovativeness and originality is measured with three, five-point uni-polar items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure the degree to which a person views himself/herself as being creative.

Seven, five-point items are used to measure a personality trait having to do with the amount of attention given to one's health and to monitoring any changes.

One's chronic desire to make the optimal choice when making decisions is measured with four, nine-point items.  The construct attempting to be measured is the opposite of what is sometimes referred to as satisficing.

The scale is intended to measure the strength of the connection between a person's self-concept and a product.  Six, seven-point items compose the scale.

How much a person likes to study math and is confident in his/her mathematical aptitude is measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items.