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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

personality

With eight, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the tendency of a person to use numerical information, to engage in thinking with such information, and to enjoy it.

The four, seven-point items composing this scale attempt to measure a person's trait-like tendency to feel compassion and/or sympathy for others, particularly those who are suffering.

The extent to which a person expresses his/her identity by watching a particular event is measured with three items.

How much a person reports thinking mostly about what is happening at the current time is measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-type items.  While none of the statements explicitly refer to the past or the future, the implication is that the focus is more on the present than on those other time periods.

Three items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes his/her identity has been put into something he/she is creating or helping to produce.

The intended construct being measured has to do with a person's general tendency to think either analytically (focus on the parts) or holistically (focus on the whole).  The scale is composed of six, five-point items.

Using ten items, the scale attempts to measure a person's cognitive orientation to either focus on the whole more so than the parts (holistic thinking) or to devote more attention to the parts than to the whole (analytic thinking). 

The degree to which a consumer describes him/herself as a technology pioneer and opinion leader is measured in this scale using seven Likert-type items.

The five, seven-point semantic differentials that make up this scale are used to measure the extent to which a person is open to new ideas and experiences.

Four statements are used in this scale to measure how much a person focuses his/her attention on the past.