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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

personality

The extent to which a person views him/herself as being creative and believes that others think that as well is measured in this scale with three, five-point items.

A person's ability to imagine how new product concepts could be developed in order to be more useful and relevant to consumers is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that fate determines outcomes in life (external locus of control) verses self (internal locus of control) is measured in this scale using six, seven-point items. 

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five, 11-point items are used in this scale to measure the cognitive and emotional bonds between a brand and a consumer.

The salience of the cognitive and emotional bonds between a brand and a consumer is measured in this scale with three, 11-point items.  Salience is indicated by the frequency and ease with which brand-related emotions and thoughts are described as occurring.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by a personality-type factor having to do with productivity and intelligence.

A person's belief in either the stability of personality traits (entity theory) or their malleability (incremental theory) is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer views a particular brand as being indicative of one's self is measured in this scale with four Likert-type statements.  The scale was called brand signaling by Park and John (2010).

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's reluctance to engage in behaviors that appear to be risky.