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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

personality

Using eight uni-polar adjectives, this scale is intended to measure the theorized dimension of personality having to do with the degree to which a person has a tendency to seek efficiency and structure.

The scale is composed of six, six-point Likert-type items that measure a person's preference for planning as well as the extent to which the individual develops goals and uses reminders of those goals.  As explained below, there are five versions of the scale, varying on what they focus.

This scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person's preference for certainty and tendency to feel anxious when outcomes are uncertain.

The chronic tendency to focus on the present as opposed to the future or the past is measured in this scale using five, seven-point Likert-like items.

Five, seven-point Likert-like items are used to measure the chronic tendency to focus on the future rather than the present or the past.

The scale measures the degree to which a person thinks about the potential future consequences of his/her current behavior and how much he/she is influenced by these possible outcomes.  Twelve items are used to measure the construct.

The degree to which luxury brands are viewed as expressing something about one's self (beliefs, attitudes, values) is measured with this scale using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person's tendency to respond angrily and with hostility when provoked is measured in this scale using six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The purpose of this scale is to measure the degree to which a consumer includes some important brands in his/her self-concept.  Eight, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the construct.

Ten, five point Likert-like items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person who has recently engaged in a certain task describes his/her processing of information to have been done in a logical, rule-based manner.