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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

personality

A person's ability to imagine how new product concepts could be developed in order to be more useful and relevant to consumers is measured in this scale with eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes that fate determines outcomes in life (external locus of control) verses self (internal locus of control) is measured in this scale using six, seven-point items. 

The scale has been used to measure a type of private introspection and self-attentiveness stimulated by curiosity.  Twelve, five-point Likert-type items compose the scale.

Five, 11-point items are used in this scale to measure the cognitive and emotional bonds between a brand and a consumer.

The salience of the cognitive and emotional bonds between a brand and a consumer is measured in this scale with three, 11-point items.  Salience is indicated by the frequency and ease with which brand-related emotions and thoughts are described as occurring.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person is characterized by a personality-type factor having to do with productivity and intelligence.

A person's belief in either the stability of personality traits (entity theory) or their malleability (incremental theory) is measured in this scale using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a consumer views a particular brand as being indicative of one's self is measured in this scale with four Likert-type statements.  The scale was called brand signaling by Park and John (2010).

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person's reluctance to engage in behaviors that appear to be risky.

Using eight uni-polar adjectives, this scale is intended to measure the theorized dimension of personality having to do with the degree to which a person has a tendency to seek efficiency and structure.