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Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

persuasion

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s resistance to norms and influence from others.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message stresses how customers can participate in an activity.

The degree to which a person has been persuaded by an advertisement to engage in behaviors that support of a particular cause is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s beliefs about the degree to which he/she is prone to changing attitudes or having them changed is measured with sixteen, seven-point Likert-type items. 

This Likert scale measures a person’s admission that he/she was easily influenced by the message in a particular ad and had difficulty resisting it.  A seven- and a four-item version are discussed.  Although the scale was made for use with ads, it can be easily modified for use with other types of presentations such as political speeches, religious sermons, educational lectures, movies, etc.

This scale uses four items and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the degree to which a person believes an advertising message is compelling and convincing.

How effective a person believes a particular anti-smoking message to be in terms of changing attitudes and behaviors is measured with three items.

A consumer’s belief that he/she does not have the ability to sway a brand and its employees toward his/her stance with regard to some issue or conflict is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer is motivated to resist a specific object, such as an ad, that is believed to have been forced upon him/her.  The emphasis is on the impropriety of the object rather than how much it limits one’s decision-making freedom.

With four, five-point Likert-type statements, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that other consumers come to him/her for product-related advice and are positively influenced by it. Since two of the items include the word “new” it also suggests that this scale taps into a facet of innovativeness as well as the person’s general ability to influence product-related opinions and behaviors.