You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

persuasion

The importance of a person’s attitude about a particular object or topic and the certainty of his/her attitude is measured with five, seven-point items.

The belief in one’s ability to influence another person or group is measured with eight statements. To be clear, the scale does not explicitly measure one’s use of power but rather the confidence that one has it and can use it.

The extent to which a person has been encouraged by friends and/or co-workers to donate more and to engage in charitable behaviors is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures a person's response to an advertisement promoting responsible drinking.  Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a person will respond successfully to the ad by drinking responsibly.

One's feeling that someone (unnamed) was trying to influence his/her evaluation in a particular situation is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, it is not just that the person feels that there was an attempt to influence him/her but that there was pressure to give a certain evaluation.

The degree to which a person rebuffs attempts at being persuaded, with an emphasis on recent efforts, is measured in this scale using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The extent of a person's negative beliefs regarding "advergames" made for children is measured with six Likert-type items.  (Advergames are custom-made for a good or service in order to entertain potential consumers as well as promote the brand.)

The degree to which a person manages his/her behavior so as to present a positive image to others is measured with Likert-type items.

A person's stated likelihood of using public transportation more than in the past is measured with four, seven-point items. 

How much a person views the interaction that occurred between him/herself and another person as being competitive and businesslike is measured using four, seven-point items.