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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

persuasion

Six Likert-type statements are used to measure one's familiarity with the persuasion tactics used by marketers to sell products and having confidence in one's ability to deal with those tactics.

This scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person believes that an advertisement is responsible for changing his/her attitude about a brand. The scale was called change mind by Smith, Chen, and Yang (2008).

The scale uses three statements and a seven-point Likert-type response format to measure the extent to which something has helped a person want to exercise regularly. The motivating factor in the study by Nan (2008) was a public service announcement. However, the items seem to be amenable for use with other stimuli.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items measure a consumer's belief that other consumers come to him or her for information about products to buy and are influenced by the information received. The scale is purposefully constructed to be amenable for adaptation to a variety of product categories but is not a generalized opinion leadership scale. The authors (Flynn, Goldsmith, and Eastman 1996) believed the construct to be monomorphic, such that opinion leadership in technologically advanced cultures tends to focus on one topical area rather than many (polymorphic).

Seven unipolar items with a seven-point response format are used in this scale to measure the level of annoyance and aggravation a person reports with respect to some specified object (e.g., person, ad).

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the interest and relevance a person expresses having in a message.

Three questions with a dichotomous response format (yes/no) are used in this scale to measure the extent to which a person reports that direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising has influenced him/her to speak with a physician about the drug and/or his/her medical condition.

Seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that an ad has disparaged a competitor.

This scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the extent to which a person believes that an advertisement is responsible for helping him/her to be more willing to consider other views than his/her preconceptions about some object. The scale was called resistance by Smith, Chen, and Yang (2008) because they reverse-scored each item.

This six-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures a person's belief that an advertisement was unacceptably persuasive.