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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

pleasure

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how pleasurable and delicious a certain food or beverage is considered to be.  The scale is general in the sense that it is an overall measure rather than assessing a particular type of taste such as sweet, salty, spicy, etc.

Three, seven-point unipolar items measure the extent to which a person believes that he/she has been praised and felt gratified. 

How much a consumer believes a particular subscription contract would be very beneficial to him/her is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

How much a person reports feeling happy and content as opposed to sad and depressed at a particular point in time is measured with eight, seven-point uni-polar items. 

The degree to which a person derives pleasure from the suffering that someone or something else has experienced due to his/her actions is measured with seven items.

The degree to which a person is happy with a resort and pleased with his/her service experience there is measured with a seven-point Likert-type scale.  Three slightly different versions are described.  One directly measures satisfaction, another directly measures dissatisfaction, and the third one has greater emphasis on the service experience.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how much a person viewed the goal of a particular choice he/she made being gratification seeking rather than avoiding indulgence.

How beautiful and pleasing an object appears to be is measured with four, seven-point uni-polar items.

Five, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a consumer’s judgement of a product’s quality and the enjoyment it would bring.  As written, the implication of some items is that the consumer has not experienced the product yet.  In that sense, the scale measures anticipated value.

The scale uses three, nine-point items to measure a person’s belief that a particular portion of food is a sufficient quantity for enjoying the taste of a specified food.