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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

possessions

The scale is composed of four, seven-point items that measure the likelihood that a person will donate a product of his/hers that is not used anymore but could still be useful to someone else.

Three items are used to measure a person’s motivation to look for and gather items he/she owns that are not used anymore and could be donated.  The scale seems to make most sense to use when there has been an appeal of some sort that asked potential donors to think about things of theirs that could be given away.

A person's attitude regarding his/her financial position relative to peers and to the previous year is measured using a five-item, nine-point scale.

How much an object is worth to a person is measured in this scale with three items.  Although the scale might be used for other purposes, it makes the most sense when used with an object that has been owned or associated with someone who could be viewed by the respondent as a "celebrity."  Even if that person is not liked, the association may lead to the object being valued more by the respondent than it otherwise would have been.

This six-item, five-point Likert-type scale can be used to measure how much consumers have a relationship with a product and feel that it belongs to them even though they do not legally possess it.

This three item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a person has a feeling of owning an object without actually having possession of it.  While it might be possible to use the scale when people do have some legitimate legal claim to an object, it was not developed for that purpose but instead was meant for occasions when people do not possess an object but feel as if they do.

The scale is composed of eight, six-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure a consumer lifestyle trait characterized by the tendency to be both restrained in acquiring products as well as resourceful in using them.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she has the material things he/she wants and can afford to buy whatever else is desired. The scale was referred to as money-luxury by Thomson (2006).

Three, seven-point terms are used to measure how much pride-related emotion a person feels with respect to a specified object.

The degree to which a person desires to maintain control over one's possessions is measured using a nine-item, five-point, Likert-type scale. A four-item version of the scale was used by O'Guinn and Faber (1989).