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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

preference

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a consumer likes the design of a product because it fits with his/her preferences.

The favorability of one brand compared to another is measured with three, nine-point questions. 

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s attitude regarding how much consumers differ in what they want from a product in a certain category.  In other words, do consumers believe that people vary in their beliefs about what makes a product good or bad?

A customer’s belief that something such as a particular brand or company is better than the alternatives and that he/she is loyal to it, is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.

The extent to which a person says he/she will be excited about a particular sports team beating another team it is playing against and the likelihood he/she will engage in behaviors to express support for the team during the event is measured with four, nine-point items.  The scale items are flexible for sporting events which have two teams playing against each other or when the researcher’s desire is to focus only on two of several teams in a multi-team event such as the Olympics.

A person’s preference for multitasking (switching attention among several ongoing tasks) rather than performing one task at a time until its completion is measured in the scale with 14 Likert-type items.

The scale has three, six-point items that measure how much a consumer prefers a brand from one company verses the brand of another company.

How much change a person believes there to be in the market for a particular product category in terms of the products available, the promotion conducted, and consumer preferences is measured using four, seven-point items.

A consumer’s frequent purchase of store brands across many product categories and preference for them is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer's plan to shop at a particular retail establishment again in the future and to recommend it to others is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.