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Scale Reviews

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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

price

The degree to which a person believes that a particular company raises its prices to compensate for the expense of supporting “good” causes is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale does not measure whether or not the person agrees with the markup but just that it is occurring because of the company’s benevolent activity.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes it is likely that he/she will buy from a particular store in the future even if it raises prices and will also recommend the business to friends.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s desire to remain a customer of a retail business and willingness to pay more rather than buying from the competitors.

A person’s opinion of a retailer that focuses on how well the business satisfies customers with low prices and customer service is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer of a store believes its prices are “good” and better than the competing stores is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

This scale uses four, seven-point Likert-type items to measure how easily a shopper is able to use the necessary math to compute a discount offered by a retailer.  The scale makes sense to use when a discount is not explicit but rather must be calculated by the consumer by using the information provided, e.g., regular price and sale price.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure a shopper's belief that a particular retailer advertises sales prices in order to attract customers even though the prices have not been discounted much. 

The scale consists of three, seven-point Likert-type items and is intended to measure the degree to which a consumer not only expresses knowledge of a product's prices across competitors but knowledge of the product's individual component prices as well.  The scale probably is most suited for product categories characterized by "loose coupling" such that great freedom is offered to customers to mix components from different suppliers. 

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the concern a consumer has for paying low prices contingent on some product quality expectations.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a consumer believes that retailers offering low price guarantees do so, in general, to assure shoppers that they will receive refunds if the store does not have the lowest prices in the market area.  A version of the scale phrased specifically for a certain retailer is also reviewed.