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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

price

The degree to which a person believes that a particular company raises its prices to compensate for the expense of supporting “good” causes is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale does not measure whether or not the person agrees with the markup but just that it is occurring because of the company’s benevolent activity.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes it is likely that he/she will buy from a particular store in the future even if it raises prices and will also recommend the business to friends.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how large a consumer considers a particular discount on a product’s normal price to be.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s desire to remain a customer of a retail business and willingness to pay more rather than buying from the competitors.

The degree to which a customer is pleased with the reduction in price that he/she was able to negotiate during a recent purchase is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

A person’s opinion of a retailer that focuses on how well the business satisfies customers with low prices and customer service is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a customer of a store believes its prices are “good” and better than the competing stores is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures one's beliefs about the economic benefits that advertising has for a country.  As discussed further below, the items are phrased with respect to advertising in general but they can be easily adapted for use with particular media.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure a shopper's belief that a particular retailer advertises sales prices in order to attract customers even though the prices have not been discounted much. 

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a consumer's belief that products purchased at a certain store are cheaper than found at other stores, particularly for those products that are advertised.