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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

problem

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to actively and competently solve a customer’s problem.

With three, 101-point items, the purpose of the scale is to measure how far into the future a certain health problem is believed to be.

A customer's belief regarding how bad a problem was created by a particular product failure he/she experienced is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s pattern of acknowledging and defining needs/wants for clothing is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure the degree to which a certain problem that could be experienced at a business is viewed by a consumer as being very important rather than trivial.

A customer's belief that a certain problem with respect to service delivery is typical is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree to which it is believed that a business one has recently interacted with has resolved a particular problem in a satisfactory manner.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type statements that measure the extent to which a customer believes an airline has policies for satisfactorily addressing problems that arise as part of providing its service.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to assess the degree to which a customer believes a store has policies for satisfactorily addressing problems that arise as part of service exchanges. The emphasis in the statements is on the ease of returning items.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer believes the employees of a store or company satisfactorily solve problems that arise as part of a service exchange.