You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

problem

With three, 101-point items, the purpose of the scale is to measure how far into the future a certain health problem is believed to be.

A customer's belief regarding how bad a problem was created by a particular product failure he/she experienced is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s pattern of acknowledging and defining needs/wants for clothing is measured using eight, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally complained to a business with the purpose of getting a satisfactory solution to a problem.  Gelbrich (2010) referred to her version of the scale as problem-solving complaining.

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure the degree to which a certain problem that could be experienced at a business is viewed by a consumer as being very important rather than trivial.

A customer's belief that a certain problem with respect to service delivery is typical is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are used to measure the degree to which it is believed that a business one has recently interacted with has resolved a particular problem in a satisfactory manner.

The scale has three, five-point Likert-type statements that measure the extent to which a customer believes an airline has policies for satisfactorily addressing problems that arise as part of providing its service.

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to assess the degree to which a customer believes a store has policies for satisfactorily addressing problems that arise as part of service exchanges. The emphasis in the statements is on the ease of returning items.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer believes the employees of a store or company satisfactorily solve problems that arise as part of a service exchange.