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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

product

Using five, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a product conveys the presence of a human being, with an emphasis on social and affective attributes.

How much a consumer believes that a particular product he/she purchased was not identifiable to others nor did it draw attention.  For the scale to make sense, it probably should be used with respect to a retail store in which one’s shopping activity could be witnessed by others.

The scale measures how much a consumer believes that it is awkward and uncomfortable to purchase a particular product when the behavior can be observed by others.  Based on the items, some of the embarrassment comes from the product itself while some is due to other people witnessing the purchase.  A five- and an eight-item version are described.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.

How much a person believes it would be enjoyable to post online regarding a particular product is measured with three, seven-point items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

How much a person believes it would be a good idea for a product to be upgraded is measured with three items.  The phrasing of the sentences lends itself most to upgrade decisions made by someone else but which the respondent would be affected. 

The level of risk-related concern a consumer has about purchasing a particular object is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears it could be used with other objects that may not be considered “products” per se such as a house, a company’s stocks, or a rare piece of art.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how novel and special a person believes the design of something to be.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears to be easily adaptable for use with other objects as well, e.g., a house, a pool, a museum.

With four, nine-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person’s belief that he/she has a clear idea of what a particular brand is about and where it is headed in terms of the types of products it will offer in the future.