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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

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With four, nine-point Likert-type items, this scale measures a person’s belief that he/she has a clear idea of what a particular brand is about and where it is headed in terms of the types of products it will offer in the future.

The extent to which the use of child labor by companies affects one’s choice of which products to buy is measured with three, seven-point items. 

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure how much a person feels that he/she might not be accepted by “others” (unspecified) because of a choice he/she made.

A consumer’s stated probability of buying a particular product on a shopping trip in the next month is measured with three, seven-point items.  What makes this scale different from other measures of purchase likelihood is that this one refers to a specific time period and assumes the shopper has read some information on the package.

The scale uses seven, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s belief that an advertisement misleads people with its claims and implications about a particular product’s environmentally-related attributes.

Six, eleven-point unit-polar items are used to measure how soft and pleasing an object is judged to be.  The scale appears to most useful when measuring a sensation associated with the sense of touch.  

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure whether information about the stock level or the sales level of two comparable products is the better indicator for making a purchase decision.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.