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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

product

Six, eleven-point unit-polar items are used to measure how soft and pleasing an object is judged to be.  The scale appears to most useful when measuring a sensation associated with the sense of touch.  

Five, eleven-point items are used to measure how much a person felt a sense of “going against the flow” by doing something different and experiencing resistance against someone or something in a particular situation.  

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Five, seven-point items are used to measure whether information about the stock level or the sales level of two comparable products is the better indicator for making a purchase decision.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.

With three, seven-point Likert items, the scale measures how much a consumer likes the design of a product because it fits with his/her preferences.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes an object or experience is closely associated with his/her identity.

Three, seven-point Likert items are used to measure how visually attractive and appealing a product’s design is considered to be.

The degree to which a person thinks that an object, such as a product, expresses his/her personal uniqueness is measured with three, seven-point Likert items.

With four Likert-type statements, the scale measures how easy a consumer believes it was to compare the healthiness of some similar products by using the information available on their packages.