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production

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure how well made a particular company’s products are believed to be.

The scale is composed of four, nine-point Likert-type items that measure a consumer’s belief that a particular retailer is quality conscious and the products it sells are well made.

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures to what degree a person believes that something was difficult to make, particularly because of the time and effort involved.  The object and the party that produced it are not stated in the items themselves and must be communicated to participants in the instructions or the context of the study.  

Using three items, the scale measures the degree to which a product is believed to have a sense of tranquility and well-being that it received in the production process.  

This three item scale measures the degree to which a person thinks a product is characterized by happiness that was implanted in it by the production process.  

The scale has three items and measures the degree to which a person thinks the production process for a product gave it a sense of love.  Two slightly different versions of the scale are provided in this review.  They are similar in the statements but differ in their response formats.  One is a Likert-type scale that is useful for measuring one product/brand while the other is for comparing two products/brands.

Using three items, this scale measures the degree to which a person thinks a product has a pride-like quality that was implanted in it during the production process.

Four, nine-point uni-polar items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a particular pair of jeans is durable and well made.

Six, six-point items are used in this scale to measure a person's level of interest in knowing and talking about electrical production and providers.

Three, five-point Likert-type statements are used to measure a person's belief that government agencies in the U.S. have clear policies regarding the production of biotech crops. Sinclair and Irani (2005) referred to the scale as rule-based trust.