You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

professionalism

The scale has five, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes a particular advertisement contains elements that are novel or unusual and yet artistically arranged.

The belief that a certain website is of high quality, particularly with respect to its design and content, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures a customer’s evaluation of the rapport-building behaviors of a business’s frontline staff.  Versions with three and four items are provided.

Ten, five-point uni-polar items are used to measure how important a person believes technical aspects (lighting, sound, editing) are to judging an ad's quality.

The degree to which a person believes that an employee who has provided some service did not have an appropriate demeanor is measured in this scale using three, 10-point Likert-type items.  The scale was called social failure by Chan, Wan, and Sin (2009) to emphasize the distinction they made between this type of service failure and one that was related to the something unrelated to the provider, such as the food quality of a restaurant.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a person's attitude toward a commercial communication (e.g., ad, infomercial) he/she has been exposed to.  The emphasis is on how professionally the stimulus was produced, i.e., the form of the message rather than its information content.

The seven-point semantic differential scale is used to measure evaluations of a service provider a person knows about or has interacted with. The scale may make most sense to use with professionals such as dentists as was done by Raghubir and Corfman (1999) in one of their studies.

Snizek and Crocker (1985) used a 10-item, five-point Likert-type scale to measure the attitude toward advertising of professional services, probably from a field that has not traditionally had much advertising. The items in this scale are written so that professionals in the focal field are to respond to them rather than those who might be users of their services. Snizek and Crocker (1985) used the scale with attorneys.