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promotions

The scale has three, seven-point semantic differentials that measure how large a consumer considers a particular discount on a product’s normal price to be.

A consumer’s response to an offer of something of value is measured with five, seven-point semantic differentials.  The emphasis is on one’s affective reaction to the offer.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a consumer's subjective knowledge of the prices charged by stores for similar products and an understanding of their various price-related specials. 

With three items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a lot of effort was spent after a purchase in activity intended to benefit from a price-matching offer.

The importance a shopper places on an online store having deals, sales, and new products is measured in this scale using three, seven-point items.

The three item scale measures the extent to which a consumer believes that a lot of effort was spent before a purchase in activity intended to help qualify for the benefit of some type of sales promotion, e.g., collecting coupons to receive price discounts.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that he/she should receive a certain discount that is part of some promotion.

Three statements are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person believes that a certain store uses a form of sales promotion that is insincere and that misleads customers.

The scale uses Likert-type statements to measure the degree to which a consumer focuses on sales and trying to get the "best price."

This is a multi-item, seven-point Likert-type scale measuring the degree to which a consumer reports using coupons and enjoying it. A five-item version was used by Lichtenstein, Ridgway, and Netemeyer (1993), Lichtenstein, Netemeyer, and Burton (1995), Lichtenstein, Burton, and Netemeyer (1997), and Burton et al. (1998, 1999). In those studies the scale was referred to as coupon proneness.