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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

proximity

With three, 101-point items, the purpose of the scale is to measure how far into the future a certain health problem is believed to be.

The extent to which a person would actively avoid interacting with others if he/she were in a certain physical environment is measured with three, seven-point items. 

Using four, nine-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer considers a retailer to be close and tangible rather than distant and abstract.  As an example of the construct, a retailer that only has a website would likely be viewed by consumers as more psychologically distant than a brick-and-mortar store that is physically close to them.

The degree to which a person believes that an event will occur in the distant future rather than very soon is measured with three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale uses three items to measure the degree to which a person is very sensitive of his/her contextual environment.  Given the way the statements are currently phrased, the scale is more a state vs. trait measure.

The perceived time frame for some event is measured in this scale using three, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale is composed of six items that are intended to measure the extent to which a person views two objects as having a human-like quality and, in particular, being a pair in some way. Aggarwal and McGill (2007) used the scale with beverage bottles.

The scale is composed of three semantic differentials that are intended to measure a person's sense of the distance from one object to another. In the studies by Argo, Dahl, and Manchanda (2005) as well as Martin (2012), the scale was used to measure how participants viewed the distance of other shoppers to themselves.

The extent to which a person imagines there to be a spatio-temporal connection between an object and a fictional or historical character is measured with three items.