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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

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A person’s attitude about a particular company’s reasons for producing “environmentally friendly” products is measured with five, seven-point items.  The emphasis in two of the items is on the “environmental friendliness” of some parts of the company’s products, with that phrase meaning that the unspecified components are either good for the environment or, at least, have less of a negative impact than conventional parts.

A consumer's attitude about the informativeness and believability of communications from a company is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the communication activities referred to in the scale items can refer to advertising, the phrasing is broad enough to include those of a PR nature as well such as press releases.

Three semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how one's attitude about an organization is affected by learning it is sponsoring a certain event or cause.  It was referred to as effect on sponsor by Olson and Thjømøe (2011).

The scale is composed of seven-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a customer (the first party) who was dissatisfied with a company (the second party) expressed his/her dissatisfaction to an organization (a third party) with the hope that the information would be disseminated to relevant publics (the fourth party).

The degree to which a person views a company as supporting a cause because it helps the business in some way is measured with four Likert-type statements.

The scale is composed of four, five-point items that are intended to measure the extent to which a person believes the job performance of advertising agency account planners is judged by the awards and media attention received for the advertising. There were two versions of the scale, one to measure the way planners are currently being evaluated and another to measure the way they should be evaluated.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring the subjective likelihood that if a certain company supported a particular event then it would improve the chances that a consumer would attend to and remember the sponsor's promotion. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring how likely a particular company is viewed as being a sponsor of a variety of major sporting events. "Ubiquity" implies that the sponsor seems to be everywhere, visibly associated with lots of top sporting events.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring a person's attitude about a company's reasons for sponsoring an event, the emphasis being on the opinion that the sponsor genuinely has the "best interest" of the event in mind.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert type statements measuring the likelihood that if a certain company supported a particular event then it would improve the chances that a consumer would buy the sponsor's products. The events examined by Speed and Thompson (2000) were related to sports.