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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

purchase

This three item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures the degree to which a customer gets bored always buying the same brands and, because of that, is motivated to shop for different brands.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a consumer’s belief that buying locally produced foods helps the community and it is important to him/her to support that.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that thinking about his/her discretionary purchases would result in various negative feelings. 

The scale measures how much a consumer believes that it is awkward and uncomfortable to purchase a particular product when the behavior can be observed by others.  Based on the items, some of the embarrassment comes from the product itself while some is due to other people witnessing the purchase.  A five- and an eight-item version are described.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s stated likelihood of buying a brand due to its sponsorship of something such as event or cause.

How much a person believes it would be a good idea for a product to be upgraded is measured with three items.  The phrasing of the sentences lends itself most to upgrade decisions made by someone else but which the respondent would be affected. 

The level of risk-related concern a consumer has about purchasing a particular object is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears it could be used with other objects that may not be considered “products” per se such as a house, a company’s stocks, or a rare piece of art.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.

The extent to which the use of child labor by companies affects one’s choice of which products to buy is measured with three, seven-point items. 

A consumer’s stated probability of buying a particular product on a shopping trip in the next month is measured with three, seven-point items.  What makes this scale different from other measures of purchase likelihood is that this one refers to a specific time period and assumes the shopper has read some information on the package.