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Testimonial

I have relied on the Marketing Scales Handbooks over several years in academic and industry roles and look forward to using the newest edition. A seven on a seven-point satisfaction scale!
Tom Prinsen, Ph.D.
Global Manager Market Intelligence, Biomet Orthope

purchase

The scale measures how much a consumer believes that it is awkward and uncomfortable to purchase a particular product when the behavior can be observed by others.  Based on the items, some of the embarrassment comes from the product itself while some is due to other people witnessing the purchase.  A five- and an eight-item version are described.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items measure a person’s stated likelihood of buying a brand due to its sponsorship of something such as event or cause.

How much a person believes it would be a good idea for a product to be upgraded is measured with three items.  The phrasing of the sentences lends itself most to upgrade decisions made by someone else but which the respondent would be affected. 

The level of risk-related concern a consumer has about purchasing a particular object is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the scale was made for use with a product, it appears it could be used with other objects that may not be considered “products” per se such as a house, a company’s stocks, or a rare piece of art.

Four, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent to which a consumer would buy a brand again despite having had a bad experience with it.

The extent to which the use of child labor by companies affects one’s choice of which products to buy is measured with three, seven-point items. 

A consumer’s stated probability of buying a particular product on a shopping trip in the next month is measured with three, seven-point items.  What makes this scale different from other measures of purchase likelihood is that this one refers to a specific time period and assumes the shopper has read some information on the package.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Four, five-point Likert-type items measure a customer's attitude toward his/her current and future purchases of the brand.

The degree to which a customer promotes and refers a brand to friends and relatives because of monetary incentives from the company is measured with four, five-point Likert-type items.