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purchasing

The degree to which a consumer monitors his/her spending-related thoughts and regulates purchase decisions using self-imposed standards is measured using ten, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of three statements that measure how easy it is complete the purchase transaction at a particular store. Seiders et al. (2005) referred to the scale as transaction convenience.

This is a three-item, seven-point Likert-type scale that appears to measure one's hypothetical intention to purchase a product which has been advertised in some way that the person considered to be unpleasant or inappropriate.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a consumer identifies negative affect as the reason why he/she has purchased products.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer gathers information about product quality before making decisions because of its perceived importance.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a consumer experiences strong, positive feelings when buying products. While similar to the many shopping enjoyment scales that have been developed over time, this scale places more emphasis on the pleasure derived from the buying itself rather than the shopping activity.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the extent to which a consumer eagerly seeks lower than expected prices for products, feels good when they are found, and feels bad when they are not. The scale was called transaction utility by Völckner (2008).

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that are used to measure the degree to which a consumer hides his/her purchases from others. Ridgway, Kukar-Kinney, and Monroe (2008) referred to the scale as hiding behavior.

The degree to which a consumer views expensive products/brands as forms of self-reward and purchases them for that reason is measured with this four item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

The degree to which a person believes that happiness is derived from buying and owning things is measured in this scale with ten, four point items. The scale is intended for use with teens or even pre-teens and was called the Youth Materialism Scale by its developers (Goldberg et al. 2003)