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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

quality

The scale has three, nine-point semantic differentials that measure how enduring and long-lasting a particular object is judged to be.  The scale appears to be most appropriate when used to describe physical objects (furniture, cars, electronics) rather than non-physical entities (emotions, faith, relationships).

Three, nine-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes an object has a special intangible quality, something that can be viewed as its “essence” or “aura.”

Six semantic differentials are used to measure a consumer’s attitude about a retailer, with the emphasis on beliefs that could be considered most relevant when comparing online retailers.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that a store offers good quality that is better than the competing stores.

With four items, the scale measures the degree to which a product is believed to be genuine and original in some unstated way.  

The belief that a certain website is of high quality, particularly with respect to its design and content, is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale used three items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular set of employees express caring and attention to customers.  This scale does not measure empathy in the sense of one person experiencing the feelings on another but rather employees doing things within their power to show concern for customers.

With three, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures the quality and usefulness of a review that a person has read.  The object of the review is not stated in the scale items themselves but has to be provided to participants in the instructions or the context.  The scale seems to be flexible for use with a wide variety of things that could be reviewed, e.g., products, companies, charities, political candidates.

The level of concern a consumer has about product quality, including the willingness to pay more to get it, is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.  Three of the items are general with regard to product categories while one refers specifically to food.

The degree to which a person believes that a set of employees work together well and stand for similar things is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.