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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

quality

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person believes a group of restaurants are premium quality due to the high quality of the food as well as the prices charged.

Composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the difficulty a person has in making decisions in life, especially with respect to consumer-related choices, e.g., struggling to decide what gifts to get for friends.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items measure the degree to which a person has high standards when making choices in life and does not settle for anything less than the best.

How much a person considers a relationship he/she has with a particular entity such as a person or company to be characterized by trust and loyalty is measured with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

The scale has six items that measure the likelihood that a person will engage in behaviors indicating he/she will purchase services again from a particular business and will recommend it to others as well.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular product looks good and is durable.

Four semantic differentials are used to measure the degree to which a person believes that if he/she hired a particular person for a stated job, the outcome would be good.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how certain a person is that a particular real estate agent will provide him/her with good service in finding a place to live.

The extent to which a consumer believes that the quality and performance of options within a product category differs a lot is measured with seven, seven-point Likert-type items.  A two-item version is discussed as well.

How much a person pays attention to and looks for quality with respect to a category of objects (e.g., products) is measured with three, seven-point items.