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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

quality

This scale has six, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person's attitude regarding the degree to which a particular website can be counted on to provide accurate information about products and their prices as well as to deliver orders as promised.

The degree to which a person believes that a particular website is safe and protects customer information is measured in this scale with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of six statements measuring the utility resulting from the perceived quality and anticipated performance of a particular brand of a product. One way the scale is distinguished from that of a satisfaction scale is that it could be applied at various stages during the purchase decision process whereas satisfaction is usually measured after the decision.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a customer's belief that it is easy to do business with a company because of the helpfulness of its employees.

Three, seven-point unipolar items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person describes an object as being natural rather than artificial.

Three items are used in this scale to measure how well a person judges his/her performance to have been of a recently completed task.

The degree to which a person believes that an employee who has provided some service did not have an appropriate demeanor is measured in this scale using three, 10-point Likert-type items.  The scale was called social failure by Chan, Wan, and Sin (2009) to emphasize the distinction they made between this type of service failure and one that was related to the something unrelated to the provider, such as the food quality of a restaurant.

This is a four-item, seven-point Likert-type scale purported to measure a person's attitude about the quality of a particular testimonial advertisement.

This is a three-item, five-point scale apparently measuring a shopper's attitude about the product quality associated with a specified store, especially with regard to meat and produce. In the study by Kerin, Jain, and Howard (1992), the scale was used with reference to a shopper's most frequently patronized grocery store.

This four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a hospital, and its rooms in particular, are appealing and clean.