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Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

quality

This is a three-item, five-point scale apparently measuring a shopper's attitude about the product quality associated with a specified store, especially with regard to meat and produce. In the study by Kerin, Jain, and Howard (1992), the scale was used with reference to a shopper's most frequently patronized grocery store.

This four-item, five-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the degree to which a person thinks a hospital, and its rooms in particular, are appealing and clean.

This is a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale that is intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks a specified hospital where he/she has been a patient was accurate in its billing for the services provided.

Six, seven-point Likert-type statements measure the degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are helpful to students.

The degree to which a person thinks the professors working for an educational institution are sensitive and concerned about their students' needs is measured with a five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale.

This scale is a 21-item, seven-point Likert-type performance-based measure of service quality. It is viewed as a measure of a consumer's long-term global attitude of an organization rather than his/her transaction-specific satisfaction.

This is a five-item, seven-point Likert-type scale that is purported to measure the degree to which a person thinks a service company's employees are courteous and give customers a sense of security about doing business with them.

The degree to which a patient believes the food served in a particular hospital was delivered when expected and was appetizing is measured with a three-item, five-point Likert-type scale.

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person thinks an educational institution has grounds, buildings, equipment, and professors that are neat and clean.

This scale has six, five-point Likert-type items that are intended to measure the degree to which a person thinks the discharge process he/she experienced upon being released after a hospital stay was handled well by the hospital staff.