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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

quality

The level of concern a consumer has about product quality, including the willingness to pay more to get it, is measured in this scale with four, five-point Likert-type items.  Three of the items are general with regard to product categories while one refers specifically to food.

The degree to which a person believes that a set of employees work together well and stand for similar things is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a customer’s belief that the food in a meal is of high quality and has premium ingredients.  The scale does not measure how the food tastes per se.

The scale has four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person believes that a particular location-based retailer where he/she receives a service has facilities that are high quality and easy to use.

Employing four statements, the scale measures the degree to which a customer believes that each part (employee, department, partner) of a particular service provider works “in concert” and as one to smoothly provide service to him/her.

The scale uses eight, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a fan’s attitude about a particular sports team.  The emphasis is on the team’s high standards and its efforts to please loyal fans.

The extent to which a consumer believes there is a strong, positive connection between the price of something and its quality is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Ten, seven-point items are used to measure how effectively a product is believed to enhance physical energy and mental acuity.  To answer some of the questions, the respondent must have used the product rather than merely hearing about it.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with a variety of foods, beverages, drugs, and supplements which are claimed to increase one’s energy.

How long a product improved a person’s mental performance is assessed with four, seven-point items.  To answer the questions, the respondent must have used the product rather than merely hearing about it.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with a variety of foods and supplements for which claims are made about increasing one’s cognitive ability in some way.

A consumer’s global evaluation of a service experience is measure with three, nine-point bi-polar adjectives.