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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

quality

A customer's general evaluation of a retail store is measured in this scale with four, seven-point semantic differentials.

A product's effectiveness is measured using four, seven-point semantic differentials with an emphasis on the concentration level of the product.  Given the phrasing of the items, the scale is probably limited in its use to products that are in liquid form.

A consumer's tendency to buy well-known brand name products (national brands) rather than those owned by distributors (store brands) is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items. 

Using three, seven-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer believes a brand is consistently good. 

A seven-item, seven-point Likert-type scale is used to measure the concern a consumer has for paying low prices contingent on some product quality expectations.

Using six, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how well a person believes a particular website provides a set of services.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a person expresses positive beliefs about the functional aspects of a company's self-service technology (SST), particularly its responsiveness, reliability, and ease of use.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person thinks a company's self-service technology (SST) is interesting and feels good about using it.

The degree to which a customer believes a company's self-service technology (SST) is personalized based on its understanding of his/her individual preferences and needs is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree of perceived consistency among the product reviews a person has read is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.  The scale was referred to as WOM consensus by Khare, Labrecque, and Asare (2011).