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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
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Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

quantity

With three, seven-point semantic differentials, the scale measures how large or small an object is perceived to be.  The scale is considered general because it appears like it could be used for evaluating a wide variety of stimuli.

The belief that a particular portion of food is sufficient for satisfying one’s appetite in a particular context or for part of a meal is measured with three, nine-point items.

The scale uses three, nine-point items to measure a person’s belief that a particular portion of food is a sufficient quantity for enjoying the taste of a specified food.

The extent to which a person feels he/she has used or consumed an adequate amount of a product in a particular instance is measured with ten, seven-point items.

Three statements are used to measure a person’s opinion of the degree of complexity in an assortment of some object due to the number of options available.

Three, seven-point items measure a consumer's annoyance with the quantity of times a company has contacted him/her.  Although written with respect to e-mail messages, the items appear to be flexible for use with several other forms of contact such as phone calls, text messages, advertisements, and paper mail.

The scale is composed of three, five-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a consumer wishes that he/she could stock up on more grocery item specials but is not able to because of limitations in storage space and money. Talukdar (2008) referred to the scale as perceived inventory holding cost.

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the amount of time a person spends on the Web relative to other people.

The scale is composed of three, open-ended statements intended to measure the extent to which one watches television, the emphasis being on the number of hours spent watching TV per day.

The scale is composed of five-point, Likert-type statements and is intended to measure the degree to which a person believes there are too many commercials on television and that they are not as truthful and informative as they should be.