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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

radio

The scale appears to measure how much a person reports actively processing a stimulus s/he has been exposed to. In Lord, Lee, and Sauer (1994, 1995), the stimuli were mock radio commercials embedded in a recorded radio program. They referred to this measure as commercial processing motivation (CPM, 1994) and later as response involvement (1995). The stimulus toward which respondents were exposed in the study by Ahluwalia, Unnava, and Burnkrant (2001) was not clearly described but apparently was a folder containing a variety of information about the focal product including a Consumer Reports-type article and draft copies of advertisements. In Raju, Unnava, and Montgomery (2009) the stimulus was a print-type ad for a fictitious brand of car.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items measuring the extent to which a person reports engaging in behaviors that indicate he/she tries to avoid listening to radio commercials.

This is a three-item, nine-point Likert-type scale that measures the degree to which a person considers a commercial to have been funny.

A three-item, nine-point Likert-type scale is used in measuring the degree to which a person indicates that a commercial was annoying and unenjoyable.