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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

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Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

Six, seven-point semantic differentials measure the ease with which some particular written information was read and processed.  

The degree to which a person thinks about the meaning of a story is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes the text at a particular website is easy to read and understand is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes that literacy skills are important and that low-income families need help developing those skills is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale is intended to measure how much a person engages in particular religious activities: praying, reading scripture, and attending services.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

Eight, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person’s attitude about an article with an emphasis on its usefulness and credibility.

Three, seven-point uni-polar items compose the scale and measure the degree to which a person believes a particular magazine is useful and worth reading.  The emphasis is on the magazine's utilitarian value rather than its hedonic value.

The scale measures a person's attitude about reading (in general) and its benefits with five, seven-point semantic differentials.