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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

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The scale uses seven items to measure how much a person believes that a particular typeface is uncommon and difficult to read.  Responses to the items are made with a seven-point Likert-type scale.

Five, seven-point items measure how much cognitive effort a person put into reading some information.  

Six, seven-point semantic differentials measure the ease with which some particular written information was read and processed.  

The degree to which a person thinks about the meaning of a story is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The degree to which a person believes the text at a particular website is easy to read and understand is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.

How much a person believes that literacy skills are important and that low-income families need help developing those skills is measured with six, seven-point Likert-type items.

With three, seven-point items, the scale is intended to measure how much a person engages in particular religious activities: praying, reading scripture, and attending services.

Using seven statements, this scale measures the degree to which a person believes that he/she is familiar with and has experience using goods and/or services in a particular domain.  Versions of the scale are described for tech products, fast-food restaurants, personal banking, movie theaters, and social media websites.

Eight, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person’s attitude about an article with an emphasis on its usefulness and credibility.

Three, seven-point uni-polar items compose the scale and measure the degree to which a person believes a particular magazine is useful and worth reading.  The emphasis is on the magazine's utilitarian value rather than its hedonic value.