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Scale Reviews

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reality

The Likert scale has eight, five-point items that measure how much a person has had an experience in a virtual environment which allowed interaction with a simulated representation of a product.

The degree to which a person believes the information presented or described in an advertisement could actually happen in real life is measured with three items.

Using four, nine-point items, the scale measures the degree to which a consumer considers a retailer to be close and tangible rather than distant and abstract.  As an example of the construct, a retailer that only has a website would likely be viewed by consumers as more psychologically distant than a brick-and-mortar store that is physically close to them.

The degree to which a person believes the fundamental tenets of a religion, such as the reality of GOD, is measured using four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale measures how much a subject who has been in an experiment believes the purchase situation was realistic.  A three- and a four-item version were created.

The extent to which a person is superstitious is measured based his/her belief in three phenomena that, if genuine, would violate basic limiting principles of science.

The extent to which a person believes that a particular story and the facts stated in it are correct is measured in this scale using three, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by simply replacing the word "story" in each item with something else if desired.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's belief that a story describes something that he/she as well as the person's peer group would experience

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure how much a person believes the ads for products placed within video games makes the experience more realistic.  As currently phrased, the statements are not specific to any particular game but rather, refer to in-game advertising in general.

The degree to which a consumer typically experiences a sense of being in another reality when shopping online is measured with four statements.  As currently phrased, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to online shopping in general.