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Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

recommendation

The belief that a salesperson was “redirecting” one’s attention by pushing him/her to purchase a product other than the intended one is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes it is likely that he/she will buy from a particular store in the future even if it raises prices and will also recommend the business to friends.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s intention to recommend something to others such as a service provider, retailer, website, or brand.

The likelihood of engaging in certain loyalty-related activities are measured with this seven-point scale.  Versions with three, four, and six items are discussed.  While the scale might be adapted for use with a variety of businesses, it is most suited for hotels and restaurants.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s willingness to encourage others to attend the games of a particular sports team.

A consumer’s frequent purchase of store brands across many product categories and preference for them is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s patronage of a particular type of retail store and willingness to recommend it to others is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure patronage of a specific store but rather a category of stores.  The items can be easily adapted for different types of stores, e.g., discounters, hypermarkets, convenience, specialty.

A person’s expressed likelihood of supporting a nonprofit organization or cause in various ways is measured with three, seven-point items.

The degree to which a customer believes a particular salesperson tried to understand his/her needs with the best of intentions is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point items that are used to measure a person's intention to not only say nice things about a company to friends, family, and others but also to recommend they purchase its products.