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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

recommendation

The scale has three, nine-point items that measure a person’s stated likelihood of sharing good information about a brand to others he/she knows.

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood that a consumer will regularly wear sunscreen in the future as well as recommend that others do so too.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the likelihood a consumer will avoid buying products that contain a specific chemical and, instead, will purchase a particular brand that does not have the chemical.

The belief that a salesperson was “redirecting” one’s attention by pushing him/her to purchase a product other than the intended one is measured using three, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person believes it is likely that he/she will buy from a particular store in the future even if it raises prices and will also recommend the business to friends.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a person’s intention to recommend something to others such as a service provider, retailer, website, or brand.

The likelihood of engaging in certain loyalty-related activities are measured with this seven-point scale.  Versions with three, four, and six items are discussed.  While the scale might be adapted for use with a variety of businesses, it is most suited for hotels and restaurants.

With three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a person’s willingness to encourage others to attend the games of a particular sports team.

A consumer’s frequent purchase of store brands across many product categories and preference for them is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

A consumer’s patronage of a particular type of retail store and willingness to recommend it to others is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  To be clear, the scale does not measure patronage of a specific store but rather a category of stores.  The items can be easily adapted for different types of stores, e.g., discounters, hypermarkets, convenience, specialty.