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The Marketing Scales website is a gold mine of information.  It is the only source that helps me understand the psychometric quality of the instruments used in past research.  I recommend that researchers bookmark this site . . . they will be back!
Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

relationships

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how well one person knows a particular person and believes their relationship is important.

With three items, this scale measures a consumer’s belief that a brand expresses interest in being part of one’s life.

This three-item scale measures the belief that a brand is attempting to build a sense of closeness between itself and the consumer (the respondent).

With ten Likert items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes that his/her parent(s) made few demands on the kids while they were growing up and allowed them to regulate their own activities.

Using 13 Likert-type items and a 101-point response format, the scale measures the degree to which a person reports having one-way affiliation behavior and desires with a media celebrity. 

How much a person has experienced the feeling of being isolated and ostracized is measured with three, seven-point items.  Clear instructions should be provided to participants so that they respond with respect to a particular time period.

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a trait-like attachment style characterized by the fear of rejection and abandonment.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has an affective connection with a particular organization that is reflected in expressions of positive emotions.

The scale contains four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s use of self-categorization and conceptual overlap to consciously link his/her identity with the identity of a particular organization.