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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

relationships

The degree to which a certain man is viewed as being in love with a certain woman is measured using three, seven-point items.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for use with other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure the self-expressed likelihood that one would go after and even seduce a particular man.  (The items appear to be easily adaptable for other interpersonal relationships as discussed further below.)

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items measuring a customer’s belief that a salesperson tried to relate to him/her as a person and discussed other things than just the purchase.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type items to measure the importance placed on securing and strengthening one's future position in a group.

Three, seven-point items are used to measure the extent to which a person believes a certain social group is composed of several subgroups.

This five item, seven-point Likert-type scale measures one's lack of friends who can provide a sense of belonging as well as understanding and help.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the desire by a customer to use acts of goodwill to restore or rebuild a damaged relationship with an offending company.

Eighteen Likert-type items are used in the scale to measure a person's inclination to distrust relationships as well as to maintain independence and emotional distance from his/her relationship partners.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer has an excessive need to be valued by a business and worries about rejection and abandonment.

The degree to which a customer finds comfort in having a close relationship with a company is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.  If reverse-scored, as did Mende, Bolton, and Bitner (2013), the scale can be interpreted as measuring the extent to which a customer feels uncomfortable being dependent on the company.