You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

The Handbook series is a significant compendium of scales published in the most impacting marketing literature. I am a proud owner of the series and hope to be able to continue collecting the volumes in the years to come.
Dr. Emanuel Said
Lecturer in Marketing, University of Malta

relationships

The five, nine-point, Likert-type scale measures how much a person expresses satisfaction with his/her relationship with a person as a result of a gift that person has given.

The scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items to measure a trait-like attachment style characterized by the fear of rejection and abandonment.

With four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person has an affective connection with a particular organization that is reflected in expressions of positive emotions.

The scale contains four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s use of self-categorization and conceptual overlap to consciously link his/her identity with the identity of a particular organization.

The scale has three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a person redefined his/her role in a relationship due to some event.  The event is not stated in the items themselves but should be made clear to respondents in the context of the study or the instructions.

The degree to which a person believes that a set of employees work together well and stand for similar things is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four statements are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular service provider helps him/her to become more knowledgeable and skilled with respect to the service.

The extent to which a customer believes a particular service provider expresses genuine interest in him/her and encourages communication is measured with four items.

How much a person likes another person and would like to interact with him/her more is measured with eight, ten-point Likert-type items.

Using four, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the strength of a person’s emotional bond to the people associated with a specific place.  To be clear, the scale is intended to measure attachment to the people who come to a place or, possibly, work there rather than attachment to the physical dimension of the place.