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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensible in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

relationships

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes his/her relationship with a company is based on the personal service that comes from being treated as an individual.

To measure a customer's level of attachment to a business, this scale uses five, seven-point Likert-type items.  The scale is similar in nature to several measures of commitment in the database.  This one was called customer-company identification by Homburg, Wieseke, and Hoyer (2009).

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a person feels a sense of emotional appreciation for unspecified benefits received from a certain party.

Six, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person expresses an emotional bond with an entity that involves people.  As used by Raggio and Folse (2009), the entity was a U.S. state.  It seems that the scale could be used with companies, stores, social organizations, universities, etc.

Three uni-polar items are used in this scale to measure the strength of the emotional connection a consumer feels with a brand.

Four indicators are used to measure the strength of the relationship between two individuals as expressed by one of the two.

The scale measures the degree to which a customer believes the relationship he/she has with an employee is warm and pleasant.  A four- and a six-item version are described.

Eight items with a nine-point response format are used to measure the degree to which a person views a company as being associated with, if not part of, his/her personal identity.

Five, five-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a person feels a strong psychological and emotional connection to the global community rather than to any particular nation.

The scale is composed of four, seven point items that are intended to measure the extent to which a person perceives that some objects as a set appear to depict or symbolize a typical family. The objects could be people, such as in an ad, or they could be products, such as beverage bottles in a product line as done by Aggarwal and McGill (2007).