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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

relationships

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure a customer's attitude about the success of a financial adviser in helping to achieve one's investment goals. The scale was called technical service quality by Bell, Seigyoung, and Smalley (2005).

Six, five point Likert-type items are used to measure the degree to which a customer believes a service provider is trustworthy and caring based on a recent encounter. Hausman (2004) used the scale in the patient-physician context and referred it as Social Aspects of Professional Service.

The scale is composed of seven, nine-point statements that attempt to assess the value a person places on the safety and stability of individual and group relationships.

The degree of satisfaction a consumer reports with respect to the services provided by a certain company/business is measured in this scale with seven, five-point items.

Ten, seven-point items are used to measure a customer's level of satisfaction with several aspects of a relationship with a dealership where he/she has purchased a car.

The four item scale measures the degree to which a customer is pleased with a decision that was made regarding the selection of service provider.

The scale has nine, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure a person's belief that a certain business offers the opportunity for interpersonal interaction and friendship between the business and the customer as well as customer-to-customer. Although the scale was developed for use with an online store, it seems to be amenable for use with brick-and-mortar retailers as well if they have websites with social features.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type statements intended to measure a person's belief that a certain business offers financial rewards to its customers in order to motivate repeat purchases.

The scale is composed of six, seven-point Likert-type statements that measure the degree to which a person believes that his/her support of a particular organization is truly appreciated.

Three, seven-point statements are used to measure a person's willingness and interest to assist an organization  that has asked for his/her help to accomplish some task. The scale was referred to as reactions to marketing actions by Aggarwal (2004).