You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

This website has truly been a welcome gift! The Day Pass is extremely affordable & the site is so user friendly to navigate. It provides a wealth of information including, the source, validity, & references for my doctorate research project. I highly recommend this to anyone as it is truly an invaluable research tool!
Suzanne Cromlish, PhD
Saint Xavier University, Chicago

relationships

The scale is used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) does not want to have a personal relationship with another person/party (professional service provider). The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) believes that another person/party has listened and understood his/her requests and performs the service with them in mind. The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

This four-item, seven-point scale measures the extent to which a person is described by respondents as being organized and capable of doing something.  The scale was used by Price and Arnould (1999) for evaluating a hairstylist.

The scale is used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) expresses intentions to continue a relationship with another person/party (professional service provider). The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

The eleven-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the extent to which one person in a professional relationship considers the other party to be a friend. One party is the service provider and the other is the service receiver (client, patient, customer). Very slight changes in the scale can be made to measure either the client's perspective or the service provider's. The scale touches on three key facets of the construct: instrumentality, sociability, and reciprocity. The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

This is an eight-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times a customer indicates having been contacted by his/her agent in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond with regard to their insurance agents.