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Testimonial

This scales book is a classic in psychometrics. It is instrumental for survey researchers in the fields of advertising, marketing, consumer psychology, and other related fields that rely largely on attitudinal measures. My copy has gotten me through years of field research by helping provide testable, reliable scales.
Angeline Close Scheinbaum, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

relationships

Four, five-point statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer expresses satisfaction with aspects of a service provider related to the quality of employee/customer interaction.

The scale uses three, seven-point Likert-type statements to measure a customer's belief that a specific retailer tends to treat its regular customers better than its less regular ones.

Five statements are used to measure the benefits above and beyond the core service performance that a consumer perceives receiving as a result of having a long-term relationship with a service provider. In particular, this scale is distinguished from two others also tapping into relational benefits (Confidence and Special Treatment) by focusing on the familiarity or even friendship one feels by having a relationship with a specific service firm.  This version of the scale used a six-point, Likert-type response format. Another version of the scale used the same items but with different directions (provided below) to measure the importance of this benefit. The anchors for that version were very unimportant and very important.

The six-item, five-point scale measures the extent to which a person considers another person to be likeable and pleasant to be around. Due to the phrasing of the last two items, the focus of the scale is on the perceived friendliness of a service provider by a client. The service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

The scale is used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) does not want to have a personal relationship with another person/party (professional service provider). The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

Three, five-point statements are used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) believes that another person/party has listened and understood his/her requests and performs the service with them in mind. The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

This four-item, seven-point scale measures the extent to which a person is described by respondents as being organized and capable of doing something.  The scale was used by Price and Arnould (1999) for evaluating a hairstylist.

The scale is used to measure the extent to which one person (a client) expresses intentions to continue a relationship with another person/party (professional service provider). The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

The eleven-item, seven-point scale is used to measure the extent to which one person in a professional relationship considers the other party to be a friend. One party is the service provider and the other is the service receiver (client, patient, customer). Very slight changes in the scale can be made to measure either the client's perspective or the service provider's. The scale touches on three key facets of the construct: instrumentality, sociability, and reciprocity. The type of service provider studied by Price and Arnould (1999) was a hairstylist.

This is an eight-item, five-point Likert-type scale measuring the number of times a customer indicates having been contacted by his/her agent in the previous two years. Crosby and Stephens (1987) used the scale with policy owners and asked them to respond with regard to their insurance agents.