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reliability

How reliable and dependable a consumer believes a product (good or service) to be is measured with three, seven-point items.

A person’s belief regarding the durability and stability of a medium’s format is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

Using three, ten-point items, the scale measures a customer’s evaluation of the quality of a brand's goods and/or services based on recent consumption experiences.

The degree to which a person believes a particular retailer could be reliable and depended upon is measured with four, nine-point Likert-type items.

With three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures a customer’s belief that a particular online retailer delivers exactly what customers have ordered.

The scale has three, nine-point semantic differentials that measure how enduring and long-lasting a particular object is judged to be.  The scale appears to be most appropriate when used to describe physical objects (furniture, cars, electronics) rather than non-physical entities (emotions, faith, relationships).

Three, five-point Likert-type items are used to measure concerns a consumer has about a product.  The concerns have to with uncertainty about the product’s benefits as well as its need for ongoing maintenance.

Five, seven-point uni-polar items are used in this scale to measure how much a person describes someone or something as being skilled and reliable.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items compose the scale and measure the functional utility of a particular brand in a particular product category.

A consumer's belief that shopping websites are generally reliable and that Internet vendors can be trusted is measured using four items.  To be clear, the items are not specific to a particular website but rather to online shopping in general.