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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

reputation

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

With five, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s motivation to hide his/her socially-relevant mistakes and weaknesses.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends money on “social responsibility” activities in order to improve its own reputation.

A person’s hope that he/she can perform better than others in socially-relevant ways and earn admiration for it is measured with five, seven-point items.

Four semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how successful and respected a company is believed to be.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way a reference group of his/hers looks to others, particularly with respect to the area where the group members live.  

Three statements are used to measure how much a consumer believes that a set of products sharing a brand name are of high quality.

A consumer's attitude about the informativeness and believability of communications from a company is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.  While the communication activities referred to in the scale items can refer to advertising, the phrasing is broad enough to include those of a PR nature as well such as press releases.

Three items are used to measure how much a consumer believes that a brand extension will be of better quality than most other brands.  The statements are phrased somewhat hypothetically because, as used by Sichtmann and Diamantopoulos (2013), the extensions were fictitious but the brands themselves were real and familiar.

The degree to which a person believes that a brand has been made by a trustworthy company, is high quality, and is better than the competition is measured with three, five-point Likert-type items.