You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

Measuring is complex and critical for research in marketing, advertising, and consumer psychology. These books are excellent tools for researchers and professionals of those areas that need to find reliable and valid scales for their research. They have helped me save time and consider new constructs in my academic research.
Juan Fernando Tavera
University of Antioquia, COLOMBIA

reputation

Four, seven-point items measure how much a person believes that a branded product gives owners a feeling of superiority and higher status compared to other customers who do have the product.

With three, seven-point questions, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she has superiority and higher status compared to other owners/users of a particular brand.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular employee has a prestigious position in a company and is admired by other employees.

How much a consumer has positive beliefs about the multiple products that share the same particular brand name is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

With five, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s motivation to hide his/her socially-relevant mistakes and weaknesses.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends money on “social responsibility” activities in order to improve its own reputation.

A person’s hope that he/she can perform better than others in socially-relevant ways and earn admiration for it is measured with five, seven-point items.

Four semantic differentials are used in this scale to measure how successful and respected a company is believed to be.

With seven, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s self-consciousness regarding the way a reference group of his/hers looks to others, particularly with respect to the area where the group members live.