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Testimonial

The Marketing Scales Handbook is indispensable in identifying how constructs have been measured and the support for a measure's validity and reliability. I have used it since the beginning as a resource in my doctoral seminar and as an aid to my own research. An electronic version will make it even more accessible to researchers in Marketing and affiliated fields.
Dr. Terry Childers
Iowa State University

reputation

Using five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person was concerned about making a good impression with another person when communicating his/her recommendation about something. 

The scale uses seven, seven-point items to measure how much a person cares about what others think of him/her and works to have good relationships with others. 

Four, seven-point items measure how much a person believes that a branded product gives owners a feeling of superiority and higher status compared to other customers who do have the product.

With three, seven-point questions, the scale measures how much a person believes that he/she has superiority and higher status compared to other owners/users of a particular brand.

With three, seven-point items, the scale measures how much a person believes that a particular employee has a prestigious position in a company and is admired by other employees.

How much a consumer has positive beliefs about the multiple products that share the same particular brand name is measured with four, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale has three, seven-point items which measure a person’s disbelief that a particular company is one of the worst ones in its industry as reported by a major consumer organization.  The scale instructions frame the situation as hypothetical but minor changes could make the scale amenable for use with an actual event.

With five, seven-point items, the scale measures a person’s motivation to hide his/her socially-relevant mistakes and weaknesses.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes a particular company spends money on “social responsibility” activities in order to improve its own reputation.

A person’s hope that he/she can perform better than others in socially-relevant ways and earn admiration for it is measured with five, seven-point items.