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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

reputation

The degree to which a person manages his/her behavior so as to present a positive image to others is measured with Likert-type items.

A person's attitude about the steadfast, trustworthiness of a company is measured with five items.  The scale seems to be adaptable for a variety of business entities such as a store, a multi-store chain, a website, or a brand.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure how much a person uses a product because of the positive social value it is expected to have.

A three-item, five-point semantic differential scale is used to measure a person's attitude toward a certain company.

A scale composed of four items with a seven-point response format is used to measure the image a person believes that company has with several specific publics.

The scale has four items that measure the degree to which a customer believes that a particular company produces high quality, innovative goods and services.

The four items composing this scale are intended to measure the extent to which a customer believes that a particular company is responsible in its service to society and the environment.

Six items are used in this scale to measure the degree to which a customer believes that a certain company, and particularly its employees, care about customers and treat them fairly.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude toward a business or organization, with an emphasis on the pride felt from being associated with it. The entity examined in the study by Woo, Fock, and Hui (2006) was a major university in Hong Kong.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point items that assess a person's overall opinion of a company. As used by Pope, Voges, and Brown (2004), the items were phrased as semantic-differentials. In contrast, the authors' later study (Pope, Voges, and Brown 2009) adapted the scale to be Likert-type.