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Testimonial

As a researcher, it's important to use validated scales to ensure reliability and improve interpretation of research results. The Marketing Scales database provides an easy, unified source to find and reference scales, including information on reliability and validity.
Krista Holt
Senior Director, Research & Design, Vital Findings

resolution

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures how much a person believes that an employee has engaged in behaviors to actively and competently solve a customer’s problem.

The degree to which a person was easily able to understand the meaning of an ad which had an unexpected aspect to it is measured with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Three, seven-point semantic differentials are used to measure a person's belief that a story has a climax in which the main character overcomes obstacles.  The scale seems to be amenable for use with advertisements, books, and movies by making minor changes in each item.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale assesses the extent to which a person believes that the procedures used by a company to arrive at a decision regarding his/her concerns about a problem were fair.

With five, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the desire by a customer to use acts of goodwill to restore or rebuild a damaged relationship with an offending company.

A person's level of satisfaction with the way a company has resolved a problem is assessed with three, seven-point Likert-type items.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure a person's attitude about the fairness and reasonableness with which a conflict with a company was resolved.

The scale uses three, seven-point items to measure a person's evaluation of his/her mental strength at a particular point in time, e.g., while engaged in an experimental task.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure the degree to which a customer personally complained to a business with the purpose of getting a satisfactory solution to a problem.  Gelbrich (2010) referred to her version of the scale as problem-solving complaining.

Three, seven-point Likert-type items are used to measure the extent that a customer expressed dissatisfaction to a third-party about a problem with a business and sought the party's advice about seeking redress.