You are here

Scale Reviews

Find reliable measures for use in your questionnaires. Search Now

Testimonial

I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

responsibility

Four, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to assess the extent to which a person thinks that the support provided by a particular business organization to a charity is done to benefit itself rather than being motivated by altruism. The scale was called anti-altruism by Dean (2002).

Four, seven-point items are used to measure the level of personal importance a person places on the outcome of a decision he/she is making.

The scale is composed of nine, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that television broadcasters should be proactive in controlling the programming, including commercials, that are aimed at children.

The scale is composed of seven, five-point Likert-type items intended to measure the extent to which a person believes that parents should control what their children watch on television. In the studies by Walsh, Laczniak, and Carlson (1998; Carlson, Laczniak, and Walsh 2001) the scale was responded to by mothers but it appears to be amenable for use with other types of respondents as well.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a consumer has a positive attitude toward the company that makes a product featured in an ad the consumer has been exposed to. The emphasis is on the company's status with regard to societal obligations, thus, the scale was called corporate citizenship by Dean (1999).

The ten-item, seven-point scale attempts to measure the extent to which a person supports a range of social issues that companies might be involved with.  The social issues would typically be considered "liberal" because they are not traditional.

The nine-item, seven-point Likert-type scale attempts to assess a person's beliefs about the ability of companies (in general) to produce and deliver quality goods and services while also being socially responsible.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type statements that are intended to measure a consumer's commitment to a company/brand with an emphasis on his/her stated freedom in making the choice. As currently phrased, the items relate to airlines.

The scale uses three Likert-type statements to measure a consumer's attitude about a specific sales promotion technique, the emphasis being on the belief that taking advantage of the promotion would make one feel good and responsible. The scale was called the value expression benefit by Chandon, Wansink and Laurent (2000).

Seven, seven-point Likert-type statements are used to measure the extent to which a consumer believes that some specified organization can be trusted in the activities in which it engages to help protect the environment. The source in the study by Osterhus (1997) was a utility company.