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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

retail

The degree to which a consumer felt rushed and tense during a particular shopping trip to a store is measured with five, seven-point Likert-type items.

The scale uses three, five-point Likert-type items to measure the degree to which a customer believes that employees of a business engaged in behaviors that infringed on one’s space and activities in the establishment.

Using three, five-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a customer felt pressure from the employees of a retail establishment to quickly make a decision and finish activity there.

The scale used three items to measure the degree to which a person believes that a particular set of employees express caring and attention to customers.  This scale does not measure empathy in the sense of one person experiencing the feelings on another but rather employees doing things within their power to show concern for customers.

Using three items, the scale measures a customer’s positive attitude toward purchasing items in a store and shopping there again in the future.  Because the items are stated hypothetically and are indefinite about when the shopping would occur, the scale might more precisely be measuring willingness to shop or attitude toward the act of shopping than strictly shopping intention.

The five statements composing this scale are used to measure the degree to which a consumer believes that part of a particular store’s value is that shopping in it would be a pleasurable experience.  The statements are phrased hypothetically in order to fit situations in which respondents have not actually shopped at the store though they know enough about it to have an opinion.   

How much a person believes that a particular set of employees share a common physical appearance is measured with three items.  The statements are phrased generally and do not specify what attributes appear to be similar.

Four, seven-point Likert-type items are used in this scale to measure a person’s tendency to concentrate his/her shopping for a certain broad category of products in one store rather than shopping around.  The scale focuses more on the behavioral part of loyalty rather than the commitment component.

Using three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person believes the physical environment of a store is high quality.

Three statements are used to measure the extent to which a customer believes that employees of a business engaged in behaviors that disturbed one’s activities in the establishment, with an emphasis on employee distractions near closing time.