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Bob Moritz
Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation

retail

The scale has three, seven point Likert-type items and measures a shopper's attitude about the appeal of the background music played in a store. Although the scale was described as measuring "the store ambient factor" in a couple of studies (Baker, Grewal, and Parasuraman 1994; Baker, Levy, and Grewal 1992), it is clear from an examination of the items that only the music aspect of the retail atmosphere is being assessed.

Three, five-point descriptors are used to measure the degree of importance a consumer places on some store attributes related to the convenience of shopping.  Given the directions, the importance of shopping convenience is focused on one or more product categories.

The scale is a five-item, seven-point Likert-like measure of the self-reported likelihood that a consumer will shop at a specified store. The emphasis is on interaction with a particular clerk the consumer has some familiarity with.

The seven-point, three-item scale is meant to measure a consumer's expectation of the relative price level of products for sale at a specified vendor. As used by Jain and Srivastava (2000), respondents had not been to the store and only had the information provided in the experimental scenario. Thus, the scale would appear to be most relevant when a new store or online vendor has opened and the interest is in what consumers think about its price level based on what little they know about it from advertising, friends, et cetera.

The scale is composed of three open-ended statements measuring the degree to which a person shops for clothing, shoes, and electronics outside of the town in which he/she resides.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a shopper believes that the layout of a mall is conducive to getting around and accessing stores, food areas, and restrooms.

The scale is composed of five, seven-point Likert-type statements measuring the degree to which a shopper believes that a mall is appealing and stimulating.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements measuring a shopper's reaction to the music, lighting, and temperature environmental factors at a particular mall he or she is familiar with.

The scale is composed of four, five-point Likert-type statements measuring a shopper's reaction to the design and decor of a particular mall with an emphasis on the attractiveness of its interior.

A shopper's attitude about the number and quality of the employees working in a store are measured in this scale with four, seven-point Likert-type items. Although Baker, Levy, and Grewal (1992) and Baker, Grewal, and Parasuraman (1994) described the scale as measuring "the store social factor," it is clear from an examination of the items that the focus was on the employee aspect of retail social interaction.