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Scale Reviews

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I really appreciate your marketing scales database online. It is an important resource for both our students and our researchers as well. Since my copies of the original books are slowly disintegrating due to the intensive use, I am happy that you are making them available in this way. It is very helpful in the search for viable constructs on which to do sound scientific research.
Dr. Ingmar Leijen
Vrije Universiteit University, Amsterdam

reviews

The scale has three, seven-point items that measure how much a person believes the review of an experience written by someone else is specific in its details rather than general.

With three, nine-point items, the scale measures how much time and thought a person believes another person put into writing a product review.

Composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items, the scale measures the degree to which a person’s reason for providing a product review to others was a sincere concern to help them make better decisions.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing opinions with friends. 

This three-item, seven-point scale measures how concerned a person is about being embarrassed if he/she reviewed a particular good or service and it was not accepted well by others.  The items are general enough for use with regard to posting product reviews online or privately sharing one’s opinion with friends. 

With three, seven-point uni-polar items, the scale measures the quality and usefulness of a review that a person has read.  The object of the review is not stated in the scale items themselves but has to be provided to participants in the instructions or the context.  The scale seems to be flexible for use with a wide variety of things that could be reviewed, e.g., products, companies, charities, political candidates.

The scale is composed of three, seven-point Likert-type items that measure how much a person was trying to provide useful information to readers when choosing what to say in a review.  The object of the review is not stated in the scale items.  Given that, the scale is flexible for use with a wide variety of things that could be reviewed, e.g., products, companies, charities, political candidates.

The scale is composed of four, seven-point Likert-type items that measure a person’s interest and willingness to spread information about a particular product review to his/her Twitter followers.  Another aspect mentioned in two of the items is the name of the person, potentially a celebrity, who endorsed the product.

The degree of perceived consistency among the product reviews a person has read is measured using three, nine-point Likert-type items.  The scale was referred to as WOM consensus by Khare, Labrecque, and Asare (2011).